Sunday, October 12, 2014

Salvator Mundi


7 comments:

Mary Ann Kreitzer said...

It's amazing how many paintings of Jesus resemble the face on the Shroud of Turin. Is this painting attributed to DaVinci? I wonder what was available to him at the time.

Dymphna said...

Nope, not a DaVinci but I suspect the painter must have been inspired by DaVinci's work or maybe he saw a rendering of the Shroud.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

"Guido Reni (4 November 1575 – 18 August 1642) was an Italian painter of high-Baroque style."

Da Vinci was at least not his direct master:

"As a child of nine, he was apprenticed under the Bolognese studio of Denis Calvaert. Soon after, he was joined in that studio by Albani and Domenichino. He may also have trained with a painter by the name of Ferrantini. When Reni was about twenty years old, the three Calvaert pupils migrated to the rising rival studio, named Accademia degli Incamminati (Academy of the "newly embarked", or progressives), led by Lodovico Carracci. They went on to form the nucleus of a prolific and successful school of Bolognese painters who followed Annibale Carracci to Rome. Like many other Bolognese painters, Reni's painting was thematic and eclectic in style."

As a child of nine ... our times and places it would be impossible, school compulsion and all that. The great Mozart was homeschooled, apprentice to his father, though he sent his son to the Piarist school.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

Starting from Guido Reni article, I get these just painters (leaving out mecenates, like Popes) with lifetimes (sometimes through wiki linked to in other wikis):

Guido Reni (4 November 1575 – 18 August 1642)
Denis (or Denys) Calvaert (1540 – 16 April 1619)
Francesco Albani or Albano (17 March or 17 August 1578 – 4 October 1660)
Domenico Zampieri (or Domenichino; October 21, 1581 – April 6, 1641)
Ludovico (or Lodovico) Carracci (21 April 1555 – 13 November 1619)
Annibale Carracci (Italian pronunciation: [anˈnibale karˈrattʃi]; November 3, 1560 – July 15, 1609)
Giuseppe Cesari (February 1568 – 3 July 1640) was an Italian Mannerist painter, also named Il Giuseppino and called Cavaliere d'Arpino, because he was created Cavaliere di Cristo by his patron Pope Clement VIII. ... Cesari's father, Muzio Cesari,[1] had been a native of Arpino, but Giuseppe himself was born in Rome.
Giovanni Lanfranco (26 January 1582 – 30 November 1647)
Pietro da Cortona (1 November 1596/7[1] – 16 May 1669) was born Pietro Berrettini, but is primarily known by the name of his native town of Cortona in Tuscany.
Simone Cantarini (12 April 1612 – 15 October 1648), also known as Simone da Pesaro, was an Italian painter and etcher[1] of the Bolognese School of painting.
Giovanni Battista Michelini (also called il Folignate) (1604–1655) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, active mainly in Foligno and Rome. He was born in Foligno, but became a pupil of Guido Reni. He painted mainly religious and mythological subjects.
Guido Cagnacci (January 19, 1601 – 1663) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, who produced many works characterized by their use of chiaroscuro and their sensual subjects. He was influenced by the masters of the Bolognese School.
Jean Boulanger (1606–1660) was a French painter active in Italy during the Baroque period. (famously portrayed Nostradamus)
Vicenzo Gotti (c. 1580 – 1636) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period.
Emilio Savonanzi, nicknamed il Reniano (1580-1666) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, active mainly in and around his native Bologna. He trained under Guido Reni, hence his nickname.
[Sebastiano Brunetti (died 1649) was an Italian painter active in his native Bologna. He first trained with Lucio Massari, then Guido Reni.]
Lucio Massari (22 January 1569 – 3 November 1633) was an Italian painter of the School of Bologna.
Paolo Biancucci (1583–1653) was born at Lucca and was a pupil of Guido Reni, and influenced by Sassoferrato.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

Giovanni Battista Salvi da Sassoferrato (August 25, 1609 – August 8, 1685), also known as Giovanni Battista Salvi, was an Italian Baroque painter. He is often referred to only by the town of his birthplace (Sassoferrato), as was customary in his time, and for example seen with da Vinci and Caravaggio. (Painted a very beautiful Virgin Mary I have seen on Catholic blogs, perhaps even this one).
Domenico Maria Canuti (5 April 1625– 6 April 1684) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, active mainly in Bologna and Rome.
Pietro Ricchi (1606 – 15 August 1675) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, born in Lucca.
Bartolomeo Marescotti (1590-1630)[1] was an Italian painter active during the Baroque, mainly in his native Bologna. He was a pupil and close follower of Guido Reni. He died during a plague epidemic. (Which might explain death at age 40)
Giovanni Giacomo Semenza (18 July 1580 – 1638) was an Italian painter of the early Baroque period. Born in Bologna and also known as Giacomo Sementi. He was a pupil of the painter Denis Calvaert, then of Guido Reni. Among his pupils were Giacinto Brandi. He painted a Christ the Redeemer for the church of St. Catherine in Bologna.
Giacinto Brandi (1621 – 19 January 1691) was an Italian painter of the Baroque era, active mainly in Rome and Naples. (I saw a marvellous Christ in Gethsemani on his wiki)
[Giovanni Maria Tamburini ....was initially a pupil of Pietro Faccini, and then of Guido Reni in Bologna.]
Pietro Faccini (1562–1602), was an Italian painter, active near his birthplace of Bologna in styles bridging Mannerism and the nascent Baroque.
Giovanni Stefano Danedi (1608 or 1612–1690) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period.
Luigi Pellegrini Scaramuccia (1616–1680) was an Italian painter and artist biographer of the Baroque period. He was a pupil, along with Giovanni Domenico Cerrini of the painter Guido Reni.
Giovanni Domenico Cerrini (1609–1681), also called Gian Domenico Cerrini or il Cavalier Perugino, was a painter of the Baroque period, born in Perugia and active mainly in Rome and influenced in large part by painters of the Bolognese School. Cerrini initially apprenticed under Giovanni Antonio Scaramuccia, then in 1638 moved into the Roman studio of Guido Reni.
Giovanni Antonio Scaramuccia (1580–1633)[1] was an Italian painter, active mainly in Rome and Perugia. Among his pupils were his son, Luigi Pellegrini Scaramuccia, Giovanni Domenico Cerrini and Paolo Gismondi.
Paolo Gismondi (known also as Paolo Perugino[1]) (Perugia, 1612 - 1685) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period.
Francesco Costanzo Cattaneo (1602 – July 3, 1665) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, born and mainly active in Ferrara. He is also known as Costanzo or Costanza Cattanio. He initially trained with Scarsellino in Ferrara, then spent some time in Bologna, where he was first a pupil of Ippolito Scarsellino, and then may have worked under Reni.

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

Scarsellino or Ippolito Scarsella (1550 (or 1551) - 28 October 1620) was an Italian Late-Renaissance - Mannerist painter of the School of Ferrara.
Francesco Gessi (20 January 1588 – 1649) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period, active mainly in Bologna.

Hope you won't take this as spam, since you like paintings.

Now, I like pre-industrial lifespans too. First in order of appearance, having twice chosen the shorter span:

66 79 82 59 64 49 72 65 72 36 51 62 54 56 86 64 70 76 59 69 40 58 69 40 78 64 72 53 73 63 69 61

Now in order of length:

36
40 40 49
51 53 54 56 58 59 59
61 62 63 64 64 64 65 66 69 69 69
70 72 72 72 73 76 78 79
82 86

Now, spread out for numbering and stats:

36 40 40 49 51 53 54 56 58 59 59 61 62 63 64 64
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
64 65 66 69 69 69 70 72 72 72 73 76 78 79 82 86
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

Minimum 36, maximum 86
Median 64 (both 16 and 17 are 64)
Lower quartile between 56 and 58 (8 is 56, 9 is 58)
Higher quartile 72 (both 24 and 25 are 72).

Enjoy looking them up too!

Hans Georg Lundahl said...

A morality of above being: back when people believed Christ IS the Salvator Mundi, they painted better and lived about as long as now.